5G, FutureNet e Tecnologie

 

 

Amazon AWS cresce del 40% anche quest'anno: AWS continues to grow at 41% clip, profitability increases

AWS , di gran lunga il primo al mondo, non si ferma , anzi...

 

Amazon Web Services (AWS) generated revenue of $7.696 billion in Q1 2019, up 41% over the same period last year.  Operating income for the business was $2.223 billion, up 59% year over year.
On a trailing 12 months (TTM) basis, AWS represents about 11% of Amazon's net sales on a global basis,

https://ir.aboutamazon.com/static-files/ade0787c-6617-4f69-8147-5d00ff0eb0bb

Some additional AWS highlights for the quarter:

  • Amazon announced renewable energy projects in Ireland, Sweden, and the U.S. totaling over 670,000 megawatt hours of renewable energy annually, as part of its long-term commitment to achieve 100% renewable energy powering the AWS global infrastructure.
  • AWS announced several new customer commitments and major migrations during the quarter: Gogo and Lyft are going all-in on AWS; Second Spectrum and the L.A. Clippers named AWS their official cloud and machine learning provider; Standard Bank Group and Vertafore selected AWS as their preferred cloud provider; the Guinness Six Nations Championship named AWS as their official technology provider; Volkswagen is joining forces with AWS to transform automotive manufacturing, powering the Volkswagen Industrial Cloud, and integrating more than 30,000 facilities and 1,500 suppliers and partners in Volkswagen’s global supply chain over time; and Ford and Autonomic, creators of the Transportation Mobility Cloud (TMC), selected AWS to power TMC and become the standard connected car solution for Ford vehicles, giving automotive manufacturers and software developers the cloud infrastructure needed to build innovative connected vehicle services at scale.
  • AWS continued to expand its infrastructure to best serve customers, launching the AWS Asia Pacific (Hong Kong) Region, and announcing plans for the AWS Asia Pacific (Jakarta) Region. AWS now provides 64 Availability Zones across 21 infrastructure regions globally, with announced plans for another 12 Availability Zones and four regions in Bahrain, Indonesia, Italy, and South Africa.
  • AWS announced the general availability of Amazon S3 Glacier Deep Archive, a new storage class that provides secure, durable object storage for long-term retention of data that is rarely accessed, and priced at $0.00099 per GB-month (less than one-tenth of one cent, or $1 per TB-month).
  • AWS announced the general availability of Concurrency Scaling for Amazon Redshift, a new Amazon Redshift feature that automatically adds and removes capacity to handle unpredictable demand from thousands of concurrent users. With more than 200 new features and enhancements in the last two years, Amazon Redshift is delivering an average of 10x faster query times. Pfizer, McDonald’s, Hilton Hotels Worldwide, Yelp, Intuit, Redfin, FOX Corporation, NTT DOCOMO, Equinox Fitness, and Edmunds are among the more than 10,000 customers collectively processing more than two exabytes with Amazon Redshift every day.
  • AWS announced the general availability of Amazon EFS Infrequent Access (IA), a new storage class for Amazon EFS that is designed for files accessed less frequently, enabling customers to reduce storage costs by up to 85% compared to the Amazon EFS Standard storage class. With EFS IA, Amazon EFS customers simply enable Lifecycle Management, and any file not accessed after 30 days gets automatically moved to the EFS IA storage class.
  • AWS announced Open Distro for Elasticsearch, a 100% open source distribution of the Elasticsearch analytics engine that includes features like security, alerting, cluster diagnostics, and SQL support. With all of the features of Open Distro for Elasticsearch licensed under Apache 2.0, developers can use it without any commercial use restrictions, providing customers a fully-featured, completely open source distribution that makes it easy for everyone to use, collaborate, and contribute.
  • AWS announced the general availability of Amazon WorkLink, a fully-managed service that enables companies to provide their workforce with secure one-click access to internal websites and web applications from their mobile devices without connecting to VPNs or using custom browsers. Amazon WorkLink removes the need to build and maintain complicated infrastructure and software deployments to secure mobile access to internal content while also reducing the risk of information loss or theft because content is never stored or cached on devices.
 

Tag:
Cloud Data Center

 

NTT Cresce nei data center: NTT increases investment in data centers

I data center di NTT non sono solo in giappone ma sono una rete globale

 

NTT GDC is capitalized at 1.25 billion JPY, of which 60% will be had share by NTT Com. And three other NTT Group companies newly acquired shares in NTT GDC, namely, NTT Urban Development Corporation (20%), NTT Corporation (10%) and NTT Finance Corporation (10%), all as of today.
NTT GDC oversees investment and asset-ownership functions for data center construction. Established last year, the company has increased the NTT group’s capacity to respond to rising demand for data centers and to further strengthen NTT Group’s data center businesses.
Tokyo-based NTT GDC is led by CEO Ryuichi Matsuo, concurrently the head of Data Center Services for NTT Com.

 

Telefonica confirms 'advanced' data centre deal talks

Anche Telefonica, come già han fatto AT&T e Verizon, vende i suoi data center ... attività troppo specializzata che solo pochi sanno gestire in maniera profittevole e tecnicamente efficace

 

Spanish telco could raise €600 million from sale of data centre business

Telefonica this week confirmed that it is in talks that could lead to the sale of certain data centre assets, but did not comment on the €600 million price tag some sources have pinned on the deal.
In a short securities market statement, the Spanish incumbent responded to media speculation that it is close to selling its data centre business to investment fund Asterion Capital Partners.
"Telefonica informs that it is at an advanced stage of the negotiation process for the sale of some of its data centres, which may result in one or several transactions," the telco said. The statement follows a similar announced in February, in which the operator confirmed a data centre sale was a possibility.
The latest deal rumour came from Spain's El Confidencial, which revealed that the €600 million deal with Asterion was analysed by Telefonica's board at a meeting in Madrid on Wednesday.
The news outlet's sources said Telefonica had received final offers for the business on 29 March. The process of selecting a winning bidder has taken a month due to the security issues associated with the business and the resulting conditions imposed on Asterion, they said.
El Confidencial said terms have already been agreed and Telefonica and Asterion will sign the final deal in a couple of weeks.

 

Intel Unleashes 9th Generation Mobility Lineup, Lead By Monstrous 8-Core i9-9980HK With 5GHz Boost And 45W TDP

 

Intel has unleashed the full lineup of its 9th generation mobility H-series processors and it’s clear that the company isn’t holding back any punches. The lineup is headed by the Core i9-9980HK, which is an 8-Core/16-Threads part and has a turbo boost of 5GHz with a configurable TDP of 45W only. This is nothing short of impressive and the maturity of their 14nm process clearly shows.

Intel offers Desktop calibre performance with 9th gen H-series processors

The new Intel 9th generation mobility processors will be powered by the 300-series mobile chipset and will feature plenty of new tech. Intel Wi-Fi 6 is now supported along with Intel Optane memory H10. Intel’s high capacity Intel SSD 660p is also supported as well as a total DIMM capacity of 128GB DDR4 – which is great for anyone going the creator or mobile workstation route. The H-series lineup targets the enthusiast category, all the way from content creation, gaming and to people who just like fast machines.
Intel’s thermal velocity boost technology is what essentially allows the top tier processors to achieve clock rates as high as 5GHz. Depending on the current operating temperature of the processor and how much cooling and power is available in the specific laptop, the CPU will automatically boost over the standard turbo boost till the parameters no longer remain opportunistic. What this essentially means is that unless you have one of those beast-of-a-liquid-cooled-laptops or workstation type builds, this clock rate will not be sustained.
Intel also seems to have found a niche capability with Optane memory which can act as a sort of smart cache drive for the SSD. Intel claims that the memory can open large media files 63% faster than a traditional TLC based SSD and will load gaming levels 129% faster than a standard SSD. The support for Wifi 6 also reduces latency by up to 75% and can offer nearly 3x speedier downloads. All H-series processors have 2 channels of DDR4-2666 MHz DIMMs which when combined with support for 128 Gigs of RAM means each channel can support up to 64GB each.
The lineup consists of quad-core, hexa-core and octa-core parts, divided into Core i5s, Core i7s and Core i9s. Only the Core i9s have access to thermal velocity boost and only the Core i9-9980HK has an unlocked multiplier. The mainstream high-end processor is now the Core i7-9850H which can boost up to 4.6GHz and also has a partially unlocked multiplier. This is followed by the Core i7-9750H. Both processors are hexa-core dies with hyperthreading enabled. Finally, you have the quad-core dies: the Intel Core i5-9400H and what I assume will be the entry-level choice: the Core i5-9300H.

 

The company also had the usual flurry of 1st party performance comparison against a 3-year-old system: up to 56% faster performance in gaming with up to 54% faster 4K video editing.

 

Audi Unveils AI:ME, Its High-Tech Car Of The Future

 

Audi has unveiled its autonomous car of the future at Auto Shanghai 2019.
The all-electric Audi AI:ME has the ability to drive autonomously at Level 4, meaning driving does not require assistance from the driver, though the function would be limited to a specific area, such as a highway or specially equipped area in a city.
The vehicle, called a “third living space” after home and workplace, uses technologies from the fields of artificial intelligence and machine learning and is designed to continually interact with and adapt to its surroundings.
Though designed for self-driving, the AI: ME is equipped with the traditional steering wheel and pedal controls.
The car features large stowage areas on the cockpit cover and between the front seats, with magnets serving as holders for magnetic plates or cups as occupants eat a meal while riding, according to Audi.

 

 

Volvo cars in Europe will be able to warn each other about hazardous road conditions

Servizi di sicurezza che non hanno bisogno di C-V2X ma usano 4G e 5G normale

 

Volvo is taking technology that allowed some of its vehicles to communicate with each other about hazardous road conditions and expanding it across Europe in an effort to increase safety, the automaker announced Monday.
Volvo first introduced its Hazard Light Alert and Slippery Road Alert system in 2016 on Volvo’s 90 Series cars. But it was limited to drivers in Sweden and Norway. Next week, Volvo will make the system available to drivers across Europe.
The system will be a standard feature on all 2020 model-year vehicles in Europe. The system can be retrofitted on select earlier models as well, Volvo said.
The vehicle-to-vehicle communication tech that enables the Hazard Light Alert and Slippery Road Alert system uses a cloud-based network to communicate between vehicles. For instance, when an equipped Volvo vehicle switches on the hazard light, a signal is sent to all nearby Volvo cars connected to the cloud service.
The slippery road alert works by anonymously collecting road surface information from cars farther ahead on the road and warning drivers approaching a slippery road section in advance.
“Sharing real-time safety data between cars can help avoid accidents,” Malin Ekholm, head of Volvo Cars Safety Centre said in a statement. “Volvo owners directly contribute to making roads safer for other drivers that enable the feature, while they also benefit from early warnings to potentially dangerous conditions ahead.”
The expansion of the system is the latest in a series of efforts by Volvo to improve safety within its portfolio and across the industry. Volvo said, as part of its announcement, that it has opened a central digital library of all of its past safety research, dating back to the 1970s.
Volvo Cars reiterated its call to the rest of the car industry to join it in sharing anonymized data related to traffic safety across car brands.
Earlier this year, Volvo said it would limit speeds on all new vehicles, beginning with its 2020 models, to about 111 miles per hour.
It also plans to integrate driver monitoring systems into its next-gen, SPA2-based vehicles beginning in the early 2020s. That system will be able to take action if the driver is distracted or intoxicated. The camera and other sensors will monitor the driver and will intervene if a clearly intoxicated or distracted driver does not respond to warning signals and is risking an accident involving serious injury or death. Under this scenario, Volvo could limit the car’s speed, call the Volvo on Call service on behalf of the driver or cause the vehicle to slow down and park itself on the roadside.

 

 

Ford accordo strategico con AWS: Ford signs multiyear car connectivity deal with AWS

Come già VW...

 

Ford Motor Company and Autonomic have signed a multi-year, global agreement with Amazon Web Services (AWS) for cloud connectivity services and connected car application development services for the transportation industry.
Autonomic is developing a Transportation Mobility Cloud (TMC) powered by AWS that will become the standard connected car solution for Ford vehicles.
The solution will use the breadth and depth of AWS’ portfolio of services, including Internet of Things (IoT), machine learning, analytics, and compute services.
This collaboration will significantly expand our opportunity to deliver the very best experiences to Ford vehicle and mobility customers,” said Marcy Klevorn, president of Ford Mobility. “I am excited that our future cloud standard for connected vehicle solutions will be powered by AWS in addition to Autonomic’s Transportation Mobility Cloud. Working with AWS and Autonomic, Ford and our mobility partners will have access to the industry-leading mobility platform.”
“The collaboration with Ford and Autonomic transforms the way automotive customers and partners develop connected vehicle cloud services,” said Andy Jassy, CEO of AWS. “Autonomic customers will be able to bring innovative mobility services and differentiated customer experiences to their customers worldwide, by integrating TMC with AWS, the industry’s broadest and deepest cloud platform. Such capabilities, together with AWS’s Partner Network community and broad customer base in Automotive, will help reimagine the future of the automobile industry.”
"This is an important step forward for the safe testing and integration of drones into our economy. Safety continues to be our Number One priority as this technology continues to develop and realize its full potential," said U.S. Transportation Secretary Elaine Chao.
The certification is good for two years, the FAA said. One pilot can operate up to five drones at once and only during the day. Drones cannot carry hazardous materials or hover over people, the FAA said.
The FAA said Wing demonstrated that its operations met the agency's safety requirements, based on extensive data and documentation, as well as thousands of safe flights conducted in Australia. Wing plans to reach out to the local community before it begins a food delivery trial in order to gather feedback, the FAA said.
Wing has recently begun commercial air delivery service in the north of Canberra, Australia, and is also about to begin its first trial in Europe, delivering to homes in Helsinki, Finland.
Wing said its data shows a lower risk to pedestrians from drone deliveries than the same trip made by car.
In May 2018, Chao announced approval for 10 projects to help assess how to regulate drones and integrate them safely into U.S. air space. The United States has lagged other countries in experimentation with drones, something the program hopes to correct.
In January, the FAA proposed rules that would allow drones to operate over populated areas and end a requirement for special permits for night use. The FAA is also considering moving ahead with additional rules in response to public safety and national security concerns as it works to integrate drones with airplane traffic.

 

Tags:
Cloud, Connected car

 







Servizi e Terminali

 

 

FAA clears Alphabet Inc's Wing Aviation for first U.S. drone deliveries

Servizio commerciale di consegne fuori vista del pilota, cioè con guida remota e automatica anche sorvolando aree abitate ... dopo tanti anni, siamo arrivati al sogno!

 

Alphabet Inc's Wing Aviation unit on Tuesday got the OK to start delivering goods by drone in Virginia later this year, making the sister unit of search engine Google the first company to get U.S. air carrier certification, the Federal Aviation Administration said.
This means Wing can begin a commercial service delivering goods from local businesses to homes, which includes flights beyond visual line of site and over people, the FAA and Wing said. Wing Aviation plans to start commercial package delivery in Blacksburg, Virginia, later this year.
Wing partnered with the Mid-Atlantic Aviation Partnership and Virginia Tech as one of the participants in the Transportation Department's Unmanned Aircraft Systems Integration Pilot Program.

 


Kojima Talks About The Revolutionary Changes Coming with 5G and Cloud Streaming Services Like Google Stadia

Grande intervista con un guru dei giochi

 

Hideo Kojima, the legendary creator of the Metal Gear series who is now striking out on his own with Death Stranding, is never boring in his interviews and public talks.
Japanese website Nikkei posted a new interview with him a few days ago and once again, Kojima-san provided plenty of food for thought. The topic was the advent of 5G technology and cloud streaming services such as Google Stadia; Kojima said entirely new games will be developed to suit the new format. He also mentioned that eventually, Netflix and other similar services may have categories for both interactive (games) and non-interactive (movies, TV shows) entertainment.
The future to come will begin finally. I have been saying for over 10 years, but at the time no one understood it. With “5G” and next “6G”, the evolution of technology will not stop. The world awaited finally is about to begin.
Now that 5G commercial services have begun, Google has announced a cloud gaming service, and Apple will also enhance game distribution. Clouding processes one frame of the screen by game operation with a server and delivers it to an individual. There are no dedicated game consoles, and the receiver can be a smartphone, a tablet or a PC.
Cloud games showed signs of boom five to six years ago but did not lead to explosive hits. Although there is a voice of failure, I do not think so. The technology was under the water. Realization is difficult in 4G, but I think that entertainment itself will change within five years of 5G spreading.
Games like never before come out surely. It is clear from the history of the entertainment industry. For example, the average screening time of about 2 hours for a movie was necessary because it was a movie theater. I have to sell popcorn, and after three hours I’m tired and want to go to the bathroom.
With the announcement of Google’s cloud game, there will be no dedicated game console at hand, and if you have a display, you can play a full-fledged game with streaming. Viewers watching people play on YouTube will be able to join the game as they are. But this is only an introduction.
As streaming advances further, video content such as games and movies and documentaries will be on the same track. This is the future I want most. What will happen if that happens? With Netflix etc., you will be able to select movies and games on the same screen. “Interactive games” and “non-interactive movies”, the quality of the content has been 180 degrees different so far, but the boundaries will disappear.
This movement has already come out. The video content “Black Mirror: Banders Natch” distributed last year on Netflix is so. The story goes on by the viewer selecting the action of the protagonist at the key point. I’m approaching an interactive game.
Later in the interview, he mentioned he has ‘one big thing’ he’d like to do with streaming, though he wouldn’t divulge more at this time. Kojima also said that another change coming to games and entertainment as a whole is the widespread usage of AI-powered technologies and services.
It’s definitely different. It will come out within 5 years when 5G spreads. Even with streaming, there is one big thing I want to do. I can’t say because I get so spoiled if I talk too much (laughs).
In the next five years, I think that entertainment will change with artificial intelligence (AI). AI will change what you are currently doing interactively. I talked earlier about streaming interactive content that I choose, but in the next five years, an AI that understands me may choose for myself.
The next five years or so are indeed truly promising from a technological standpoint, though it is too early to say whether they’ll fully deliver. Stay tuned on Wccftech, though, and we’ll keep you apprised of anything noteworthy.

 

Derrière ce robot qui défie l’homme au ping-pong, un peu d’IA et beaucoup d’équations - Technos et Innovations

Il primo robot che batte un uomo a ping pong

 

Le robot joueur de tennis de table de Omron à la Foire de Hanovre 2019.

Le spécialiste japonais de l’automatisation Omron a présenté à la Foire de Hanovre, qui s'est tenue du 1er au 5 avril,  la cinquième génération de son robot joueur de tennis de table. Une machine qui défie l’humain mais le conseille aussi en analysant son niveau. Détail des technologies qui l'animent.
Il fallait prendre son mal en patience pour aller défier ce robot joueur de tennis de table. Pour faire valoir les technologies qu’il utilise dans ses robots industriels, le spécialiste japonais des automatismes Omron présentait à la Foire de Hanovre la cinquième génération de son robot joueur de ping-pong. De quoi attirer une foule de visiteurs sur son stand et attiser la curiosité de L’Usine Nouvelle, qui a voulu savoir quelles technologies renferment ce robot.
D’abord il faut savoir que Hornet, de son petit nom, n’est pas seulement un joueur de tennis de table capable de défier l’homme. Il joue aussi les entraîneurs en analysant le comportement de son adversaire pour lui distiller oralement et sur un écran des conseils. "Grâce aux images de la balle captées par nos caméras, nous pouvons connaître sa trajectoire, sa vitesse et sa rotation, explique Satoshi Yase, ingénieur chez Omron, qui travaille sur le développement de ce robot dans l’un des laboratoires japonais de l’entreprise. Nous captons aussi les mouvements du joueur adverse."

Un emplacement précis à 5 millimètres près

Les mouvements de l'adversaire sont traduits en une image schématique de son corps, sous forme de segments articulés. "Les mouvements modélisés du joueur et les informations obtenues sur ses frappes sont analysés par un algorithme de deep learning, qui les compare aux données enregistrées lors des entraînements." Car régulièrement Hornet joue contre des amateurs et des joueurs experts. Résultat : tout au long du jeu, il évalue le niveau de jeu de son adversaire et n’hésite pas à lui montrer sur un écran là où il doit viser !
Voilà pour la touche intelligence artificielle du robot. L'essentiel des performances du robot pongiste vient de la résolution d'équations. Le robot est assisté dans son jeu par trois ordinateurs et un contrôleur. Côté caméras, sa "tête" en compte trois, ses deux piliers latéraux une chacun. "Trois des caméras servent à suivre la trajectoire de la balle, pour savoir où elle va tomber, détaille Satoshi Yase. Lorsque la balle franchit le filet, le robot peut délimiter le point de chute de la balle dans un cercle de 10 à 20 centimètres de diamètre. Pendant que la balle avance vers son point de chute, il réalise 200 calculs par seconde pour réduire ce cercle à un emplacement précis à 5 millimètres près."

600 millisecondes de calcul et d’exécution

A partir du moment où la balle franchit le filet, le robot va aussi commencer à calculer quelle position il va devoir prendre pour frapper en retour. "Pour décider de sa frappe, le robot va résoudre une équation à multiples variables", qui sont la vitesse de la balle, sa rotation, sa position de chute, la position de retour ciblée par le robot, la rotation de la balle pendant sa trajectoire retour et le moment de son impact, explique Satoshi Yase.
Sauf que le robot n’est pas, contrairement à l’homme, capable de frapper d’une infinité de manières. Comment faire si le résultat de l’équation est un geste que ce robot six axes n’est pas en capacité d’exécuter ? La réponse est simple. "Le robot va recalculer l’équation autant de fois que nécessaire jusqu’à trouver un résultat en accord avec ses capacités de mouvement." Il faut à Hornet 600 millisecondes pour calculer la trajectoire de la balle, déterminer sa position de frappe et exécuter son tir. Satoshi Yase l’assure, c’est à peine plus qu’un bon joueur!

 

Amazon’s empire rests on its low-key approach to AI

Unflashy but high-powered machine learning powers everything from its fulfilment centres to the cloud

 

AMAZON’S SIX-PAGE memos are famous. Executives must write one every year, laying out their business plan. Less well known is that these missives must always answer one question in particular: how are you planning to use machine learning? Responses like “not much” are, according to Amazon managers, discouraged.
Machine learning is a form of artificial intelligence (AI) which mines data for patterns that can be used to make predictions. It took root at Amazon in 1999 when Jeff Wilke joined the firm. Mr Wilke, who today is second-in-command to Jeff Bezos, set up a team of scientists to study Amazon’s internal processes in order to improve their efficiency. He wove his boffins into business units, turning a cycle of self-assessment and improvement into the default pattern. Soon the cycle involved machine-learning algorithms; the first one recommended books that customers might like. As Mr Bezos’s ambitions grew, so did the importance of automated insights.
Yet whereas its fellow tech titans flaunt their AI prowess at every opportunity—Facebook’s facial-recognition software, Apple’s Siri digital assistant or Alphabet’s self-driving cars and master go player—Amazon has adopted a lower-key approach to machine learning. Yes, its Alexa competes with Siri and the company offers predictive services in its cloud. But the algorithms most critical to the company’s success are those it uses to constantly streamline its own operations. The feedback loop looks the same as in its consumer-facing AI: build a service, attract customers, gather data, and let computers learn from these data, all at a scale that human labour could not emulate.

Mr Porter’s algorithms

Consider Amazon’s fulfilment centres. These vast warehouses, more than 100 in North America and 60-odd around the world, are the beating heart of its $207bn online-shopping business. They store and dispatch the goods Amazon sells. Inside one on the outskirts of Seattle, packages hurtle along conveyor belts at the speed of a moped. The noise is deafening—and the facility seemingly bereft of humans. Instead, inside a fenced-off area the size of a football field sit thousands of yellow, cuboid shelving units, each six feet (1.8 metres) tall. Amazon calls them pods. Hundreds of robots shuffle these in and out of neat rows, sliding beneath them and dragging them around. Toothpaste, books and socks are stacked in a manner that appears random to a human observer. Through the lens of the algorithms guiding the process, though, it all makes supreme sense.
Human workers, or “associates” in company vernacular, man stations at gaps in the fence that surrounds this “robot field”. Some pick items out of pods brought to them by a robot; others pack items into empty pods, to be whirred away and stored. Whenever they pick or place an item, they scan the product and the relevant shelf with a bar-code reader, so that the software can keep track.
The man in charge of developing these algorithms is Brad Porter, Amazon’s chief roboticist. His team is Mr Wilke’s optimisation squad for fulfilment centres. Mr Porter pays attention to “pod gaps”, or the amount of time that the human workers have to wait before a robot drags a pod to their station. Fewer and shorter gaps mean less down time for the human worker, faster flow of goods through the warehouse, and ultimately speedier Amazon delivery to your doorstep. Mr Porter’s team is constantly experimenting with new optimisations, but rolls them out with caution. Traffic jams in the robot field can be hellish.
Amazon Web Services (AWS) is the other piece of core infrastructure. It underpins Amazon’s $26bn cloud-computing business, which allows companies to host websites and apps without servers of their own.
AWS’s chief use of machine learning is to forecast demand for computation. Insufficient computing power as internet users flock to a customer’s service can engender errors—and lost sales as users encounter error pages. “We can’t say we’re out of stock,” says Andy Jassy, AWS’s boss. To ensure they never have to, Mr Jassy’s team crunches customer data. Amazon cannot see what is hosted on its servers, but it can monitor how much traffic each of its customers gets, how long the connections last and how solid they are. As in its fulfilment centres, these metadata feed machine-learning models which predict when and where AWS is going to see demand.
One of AWS’s biggest customers is Amazon itself. And one of the main things other Amazon businesses want is predictions. Demand is so high that AWS has designed a new chip, called Inferentia, to handle these tasks. Mr Jassy says that Inferentia will save Amazon money on all the machine-learning tasks it needs to run in order to keep the lights on, as well as attracting customers to its cloud services. “We believe it can be at least an order-of-magnitude improvement in cost and efficiency,” he says. The algorithms which recognise voices and understand human language in Alexa will be one big beneficiary.
The firm’s latest algorithmic venture is Amazon Go, a cashierless grocery. A bank of hundreds of cameras watches shoppers from above, converting visual data into a 3D profile which is used to track hands and arms as they handle a product. The system sees which items shoppers pick up and bills them to their Amazon account when they leave the store. Dilip Kumar, Amazon Go’s boss, stresses that the system is tracking the movements of shoppers’ bodies. It is not using facial recognition to identify them and to link them with their Amazon account, he says. Instead, this is done by swiping a bar code at the door. The system ascribes the subsequent actions of that 3D profile to the swiped Amazon account. It is an ode to machine learning, crunching data from hundreds of cameras to determine what a shopper takes. Try as he might, your correspondent could not fool the system and pilfer an item.

Fit for purpose

AI body-tracking is also popping up inside fulfilment centres. The firm has a pilot project, internally called the “Nike Intent Detection” system, which does for fulfilment-centre associates what Amazon Go does for shoppers: it tracks what they pick and place on shelves. The idea is to get rid of the hand-held bar-code reader. Such manual scanning takes time and is a bother for workers. Ideally they could place items on any shelf they like, while the system watches and keeps track. As ever, the goal is efficiency, maximising the rate at which products flow. “It feels very natural to the associates,” says Mr Porter.
Amazon’s careful approach to data collection has insulated it from some of the scrutiny that Facebook and Google have recently faced from governments. Amazon collects and processes customer data for the sole purpose of improving the experience of its customers. It does not operate in the grey area between satisfying users and customers. The two are often distinct: people get social media or search free of charge because advertisers pay Facebook and Google for access to users. For Amazon, they are mostly one and the same (though it is toying with ad sales). Where regulators do raise concerns is over Amazon’s dominance in its core business of online shopping and cloud computing. This power has been built on machine learning. It shows no signs of waning.

 

Smart speakers’ installed base to top 200 million by year end

80 milioni di pezzi vuole dire quasi uno per famiglia, negli USA ...

 

Smart speakers’ global installed base is on track to top 200 million by the end of this year, according to a report out today from analysts at Canalys. Specifically, the firm forecasts the installed base will grow by 82.4 percent, from 114 million units in 2018 to 207.9 million in 2019. The U.S. will continue to lead in terms of smart speaker adoption, but a good portion of this year’s growth will also come from East Asian markets —  particularly China, the report says.
The firm estimates 166 percent year-over-year growth in the installed base for smart speakers in mainland China this year — going from 22.5 million units in 2018 to 59.9 million in 2019 — to reach 13 percent smart speaker penetration in the region. That’s compared with 46 percent growth in the U.S. — going from 60.2 million units in 2018 to 87.8 million in 2019.
The market for China will also look much different from the U.S., where Amazon and Google today dominate. These companies don’t have a smart speaker presence in China. That means others — like Alibaba’s Tmall Genie, Xiaomi’s Xiao Ai, Baidu’s DuerOS and more — will gain traction instead. Canalys predicts Tmall will lead, with 39 percent of the 2019 smart speaker market share in mainland China, followed by 25 percent for Xiao Ai, 24 percent for DuerOS and 12 percent for all others. (Note that Canalys didn’t break out estimates for Apple HomePod in China, where it launched in January. But given its higher price point, it seems the firm isn’t predicting huge adoption at this time).

 

Comment Panasonic réinvente le Kaizen pour créer son usine modèle de l’industrie du futur - Industrie du Futur

In Panasonic gli operai danno e ricevono comandi vocali, senza usare carta o dover scrivere su tablet o pc

 

For manufacturing traceability, the production system is connected to the ERP of SAP . No more paper on the workstations. Operators receive their manufacturing instructions in a voice-like manner, and they report the state of the machines in a voice-like manner. They each have a hardened tablet with which they interact with the voice (photo beside). When checking the status of equipment, settings or reconfiguration lines, they simply check boxes or answer yes or no to questions on the screen of the tablet. "The voice becomes the link between the production equipment and the management system, says Tomokazu Ichiriki, which is collected and recorded like other production data."