ScuolaDigitaleTIM: passion, discovery and know-how ScuolaDigitaleTIM: passion, discovery and know-how

ScuolaDigitaleTIM: passion, discovery and know-how

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A total of  15 Italian provinces are involved, with 3,000 students participating in the classroom activities during the school year 2018 to 2019.
The course touches on robotics,  the Internet of Things and making. The students carry out laboratory activities because, as stated in the Creative Learning teaching model, learning that is in-depth and lasting calls for passion, discovery and concrete know-how.All students in Italy can take advantage of the multimedia contents, including the video lessons, tutorials and teaching materials, available on the site scuoladigitale.tim.it.
The objective of the  ScuolaDigitaleTIM project, designed for students between the ages of 11 and 13, is to provide education on digital technology for middle-school students so they will be better informed when the time comes to make choices in their professional or educational careers.
At certain stages in the classroom sessions, the lessons will feature a basic PC, Microninja, the mini-computer for children, produced by Olivetti.
The main tool for the laboratory activities is micro:bit, a microcomputer that is smaller than a credit card, equipped with a 25 LED display, two programmable buttons, a compass, accelerometer and temperature sensor, with Bluetooth connectivity and Wi-Fi.The children will enjoy using their imagination to experiment and create games, robots, wearable objects and much more.

MICRO:BIT, A NEW TEACHING STANDARD

Launched in the UK in 2016 as part of the BBC initiative Make it Digital to educate students about digital technology, micro:bit was distributed free of charge to about a million students and turned into a worldwide teaching standard, supported by Microsoft, Google and the MIT in Boston.

The following year the card was introduced in the United Kingdom, Finland, France, Germany,  Italy, the Netherlands and Sweden.
In a study commissioned by the BBC a year into the project, 90% of British students interviewed stated that micro:bit proved that anyone could code. And 88% said that thanks to micro:bit they had realised that programming was not as difficult as they had thought.
After using micro:bit, 39% of young girls said that they would choose computer science as a school subject, compared to 23% prior to using the card.
Micro:bit was also a success among teachers: according to 85% of the teachers interviewed, it made ICT more entertaining and got the students better involved, and it showed 80% of them that coding was not as hard as they had thought.