A contract to be proud of - Angelo, Benevento

08/14/2015 - 09:00 AM

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Angelo, Open Access Telecom Italia, is able to convince a family to install the phone in their house with a colleague. The joy and excitement for having changed the life to those people.

That day, Pasquale and I had gone out early with the Panda, we were following new places in the province where pile-driving was going on, looking for some new construction site to latch onto. Suddenly, Pasquale's by now famous shout rang out: “That's a fine house!” I slowed down to turn into the unpaved driveway leading to the small new house, recently rebuilt after the 1980 earthquake. We knocked and were greeted by a timorous lady, looking a little uncomfortable. On hearing what we had to propose, she asked us to come back in the afternoon, when we could talk to her husband. A little late, in truth, but it did not matter: one more contract made it worth arriving home a little late. While we took our leave, I noticed the children: they must have been eight and ten, behind the woman, curiously watching and listening to our intrusion. In the afternoon, we almost forgot the appointment but our travel notes facilitated the task and we turned back and reached the house. This time it was the master of the house who greeted us. He seemed rather sceptical, not an easy man to persuade. One of those men from our area who know how to work hard but have little propensity for negotiation. I began by explaining the advantages of having a telephone, saying that such a fine house could not not have one; then the cost, the possibility of paying it by instalments and all the rest of it. The two children had become three and, together with their mother, listened all sitting with us at the same table in the charming kitchen which emanated family warmth. Everyone looked in turn at the person who was talking: me proposing and explaining, the father objecting and refusing. Our audience changed from smiles and joy expressed on their faces when I was talking, to disappointment and despondency when the father replied. In the end, I persuaded him. The gentleman (I no longer remember his name), was convinced and signed the contract. The mother and the children were beside themselves, they exuded genuine happiness from every pore. We said goodbye, we left the house, and immediately after the door closed, we heard shouts of joy and victory. We looked at each other and smiled. Perhaps, deep down, we were moved, but we were proud of having brought something good into that house: our telephone. Sometimes I think of those children who will now be adults and will have grown up with the internet and our other services. Who knows whether they have ever remembered with gratitude those two chaps from Telecom who came to their house one March afternoon.

Angelo Cocquio, Benevento

 

Have the patience to listen till people find the right solution

Mary Kay Ash