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ITALY 2030

06/13/2016 - 00:30 PM

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Government, enterprises and civil society face the challenge of sustainable development

From the left: Marcella Logli, Director of Corporate Shared Value Telecom Italia, Pierluigi Stefanini, President of Unipol Group, e Aldo Cristiano, Director of Sustainability Ferrero Group

On the morning of May 30th, 2016, the Accademia di Belle Arti in Rome hosted ‘ITALY 2030: Government, enterprises and civil society face the challenge of sustainable development’, the opening event of the European Sustainable Development Week, awarded a medal by the President of the Republic of Italy.

The conference, aimed at opening up a dialogue between politics, citizens and enterprises, took place within the framework of the European Sustainable Development Week (30th May – 5th June), organised by ASviS, the Italian Alliance for Sustainable Development, and bringing together over 100 key players of the Italian politics and business world. ASviS pleaded for a decisive commitment towards sustainable development from the government, businesses and civil society, with a view to achieving the 17 objectives and 169 targets outlined in the 2030 Agenda (Sustainable Development Goals – SDGs), which Italy, among others, has agreed to pursue.

Over the course of the morning many academic, political and business personalities and institutions took to the stage, including Marcella Logli, Director of Corporate Shared Value and General Director of Telecom Italia Foundation.

TIM and Corporate Shared Value

Logli began her speech remarking on the crucial importance of Corporate Social Responsibility in achieving entrepreneurial long-term success. Despite many large players choosing not to implement an overarching strategy in this sense, Logli stressed that integrating social responsibility within business activities can lead to better opportunities of social and corporate growth.
From the Italian public’s perspective, recent findings from IPSOS show increased awareness and value assigned to corporate efforts: according to data, citizens are more and more appreciative of large companies’ good behaviour. TIM, Logli observed, is an excellent example of this new positive trend: the company’s positive reputation has increased by 5% since 2014.

Logli then talked about the evolution of TIM from the CSR to the CSV (Corporate Shared Value) model: an approach aimed at embedding sustainability within business strategy. Long-term financial growth cannot be achieved without a constant effort to improve social and environmental welfare: hence the need for an action plan that meets the social requirements of stakeholders without penalising the financial requirements of the TIM Group.

TIM’s Shared Value Model meets such social requirements by organising events and projects across three key areas of intervention: Social Innovation, Digital Culture and Environmental Protection.
For each area TIM has devised a range of events that target the creation of Corporate Shared Value along two sets of guidelines: business value (measurable according to revenue, reputation and risk management) and social value (parameters include the reduction of environmental emissions and the positive impact on employment).

Such an ambitious and effective model has been rewarded by the success of projects such as WithYouWeDo – an online crowdfunding platform designed to foster social innovation, culture and the environment – or the TIM4Coding scheme – providing primary and secondary schools with a range of simple, fun and accessible tools to teach students the foundations of programming and coding (TIM is among the founding patrons of MIUR’s Programme the Future).

In 2015 TIM’s CSV value topped 12 billions of euro, split as 3.3 billion euros of Business Value (Revenue and Cost Reduction) and the equivalent of over 9 billion euros of social value generated through business activity: a positive impact amounting to 0.5% of the overall gross domestic product of the country.