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COP23[1], held in Bonn in November 2017, made progress towards reviewing the commitments countries have made to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, despite the decision made by the Trump administration to withdraw the United States from the Paris Climate Agreement (COP21 – 2015). However, the commitments made in Paris do not however seem sufficient to achieve the target agreed in 2015, that is to maintain the increase in global temperature at under 2 degrees centigrade, and preferably under 1.5 degrees with respect to pre-industrial levels. A revision of the agreement will be the objective of the next United Nations Climate Conference, COP24, to be held in Katowice, Poland, in December 2018.

According to a report[2] by the European Environment Agency (EEA) there are ten most significant natural hazards for Europe: heat waves, torrential rain, overflowing rivers, wind storms, landslides, droughts, forest fires, avalanches, hailstorms and storm surges. Events that impact human health, the economy and ecosystems and can be exacerbated by other changes, such as soil sealing, construction in risk areas, ageing of the population or degradation of ecosystems.

The overall documented economic losses generated by atmospheric events and  extreme weather conditions in the EEA's 33 Member States over the period 1980-2016 exceeded 450 billion euros. The biggest economic repercussions were caused by flooding (around 40%), followed by storms (25%), drought (around 10%) and heat waves (around 5%). Total insurance coverage for these hazards is around 35%. Reducing the impact of dangerous weather and climate events and adapting to climate change are therefore top priorities of the European Union. Achieving these goals requires a strong commitment from all sectors of the economy, authorities and citizens.

As explained earlier, TIM approaches the issue of climate change with multiple synergistic actions: reduction of its own direct and indirect emissions of greenhouse gases;

limiting the emissions of other sectors and customers in general by supporting virtualisation and the provision of services and solutions which promote new sustainable ways of working, learning, travelling and living in general;

communicating its emissions and strategies for fighting climate change in the Sustainability Report and through responses provided to rating agencies (RobecoSAM, CDP, Vigeo Eiris, ...).

These objectives are pursued through the initiatives described in the following paragraphs on Environmental Performance/Energy and Environmental Performance/Emissions.

 

[1] The Conference of the Parties (COP) is the governing body of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC); it is convened on a yearly basis and a progressive numbering is assigned to each meeting, where parties monitor, review and advance the implementation of the Convention

[2] Climate change adaptation and disaster risk reduction in Europe – EEA Report N. 15-2017