A Scuola di Digitale con TIM: the teachers’ viewpoint A Scuola di Digitale con TIM: the teachers’ viewpoint

A Scuola di Digitale con TIM: the teachers’ viewpoint

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To take stock of this project, which kicked off again in November 2017 and brings technological innovation to Italian classrooms, we spoke with Professor Maria Di Matteo, a language teacher at the Istituto Comprensive Don Lorenzo Milani in Torre del Greco, Naples.

During the school year 2016/2017 you took part in the “Using ICT in schools, with TIM” project: what drove you to participate?
I found participation in this project to be a natural thing, I was driven by the desire to learn about innovation in the digital field. In my view, it is very important for us teachers to be updated on new technologies, given that we interact with digital natives on a daily basis. I’m also on the school’s digital team.
Can you tell us your impression of the course and this experience?
The course concise, necessarily so because of the enormous breadth of aspects and information that this discipline covers. I found it really very interesting and engaging, with well-defined themes.
I must say that I have always been fascinated by the digital world, but the course certainly pushed me further in that direction.
Do you think it’s possible to apply the innovative elements detailed in this project to Italian schools?
Greater training and information on digital issues has been sought for some time, now it's time to use all these innovative elements, link them to the digital world and apply them in an intelligent way in school education.
In your view, what are the advantages of the digitisation of schools, for both teachers and pupils?
There’s greater speed in communication and interaction: through the M.I.W (multimedia interactive whiteboard), for example, I can get the whole class involved in a task simultaneously, making it visible to everyone and allowing everyone to interact and participate. Coding, for example, also allows the pupils themselves to become active participants.
For some pupils this new approach is quite simple, I would say almost taken for granted. The greatest resistance is encountered in teachers, who sometimes seem reluctant to follow the route of innovation.