What is welfare 4.0

05/17/2017 - 03:30 PM

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We begin our journey through and a deeper look into Welfare 4.0 with Andrea Iapichino, head of TIM's People Caring project

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Production of goods and services has been going through a new revolution, similar to the industrial revolution, with direct impact on employment and the new skills required.

Today, tools to motivate changes within a company are no longer based on salary and training parameters alone but also welfare which is getting richer in terms of new proposals. We can call this novelty Welfare 4.0 or more simply W4.0.

W4.0 means coming up with new forms of retribution, not just monetary but also in terms of services. Welfare 4.0 comprises social inclusion activities and solutions that can be used to identify and develop intangible assets (i.e. non-physical goods and sources of economic benefits, even future benefits). From this point of view, W4.0 is a way for the company to communicate with its  stakeholders and facilitate comparison between institutions, businessmen and managers, professionals and Labour Law experts.

W4.0 enables creating all-round skills, thus implementing a development tool for the people within the company.

On the other hand, the company can benefit from extra energy from its people, who – being more motivated – offer a much greater contribution as opposed to simply carrying out their work. W 4.0 also allows everyone to ensure the absence of barriers or ensure that the people within the company are in a position to overcome them.

For some time now, we - at TIM - have been working on this new welfare 4.0 approach. We have identified four main clusters which gather together the main welfare services depending on the type of need they are designated to meet:

1.     Work-life balance (services aimed at creating balance between the work-life and off-work life of people, kindergartens for example)

2.     Social elevator (services that facilitate change of social status and integration between the various levels that form society, for example refund of university fees)

3.     Caring (services designed to create organisational well-being conditions, for example corporate volunteering)

4.     Inclusion (services that eliminate physical or cultural barriers that prevent people from fully being members of a community, for example work stations conceived for those with a specific physical condition)

TIM's 4 welfare clusters meet both people's primary needs and their self-accomplishment expectations. Basically, work-life balance is about services such as Smart working, Mobility management, kindergartens/nurseries, Summer trips, Family care giving; the expression “social elevator” implies things such as Scholarships, University Fees, Subsidies.
Caring is a management approach that offers people Commercial agreements, Corporate volunteering, Promotional initiatives.
Lastly, the expression “inclusion” identifies the most complex and added value area in the welfare field, which comprises labour longevity (in turn classified into mental well-being and physical well-being). In addition, we have Diversability (this expression is a linguistic approximation which refers to the 6 international classes of diversity management focusing on «ability» as the driver for creating inclusive solutions for all).